Diversity and Inclusion in Regulated Firms

Diversity and Inclusion

"The Central Bank considers that diversity and inclusion in all their forms are important components of well-managed, financially resilient, strategically-minded firms, and therefore pertinent to the Central Bank’s mandate." Behaviour and Culture of the Irish Retail Banks

Behaviour and Culture of the Irish Retail Banks | pdf 775 KB

Central Bank of Ireland considers a lack of diversity and inclusion at senior management and board level in organisations to be a leading indicator of elevated behaviour and culture risks.

At the Central Bank, we are committed to diversity to ensure our own organisation reflects the public we serve. Read our Diversity and Inclusion policy statement.

Diversity and Inclusion Policy Statement | pdf 395 KB

More information on diversity and inclusion at the Central Bank, including our gender pay gap report, is available in our careers section.

Reports on the Demographics of the Financial Sector

Each year we report on demographics of the applications received from firms for Central Bank approval for certain senior roles in financial firms in Ireland. This is part of our commitment to monitor and report on the level of diversity in the sector.

2018 Demographics of the Financial Sector Report | pdf 1383 KB 2017 Demographics of the Financial Sector Report | pdf 1055 KB 2012-2016 Demographics of the Financial Sector Report | pdf 1011 KB

Corporate Governance Codes

Read more about our Corporate Governance Codes.

Media

Deputy Governor Ed Sibley discusses the Central Bank’s view on diversity in an interview for the ECB Supervisory Newsletter.

Our thoughts on diversity can also be heard on The Irish Times business podcast (March 2017) and the OMFIF podcast.

Culture, Diversity and the Way Forward Conference 2018

In October 2018, the Central Bank held a conference with Trinity College Dublin, “Culture, Diversity and the Way Forward Conference 2018”. The conference examined the Central Bank’s Review of Behaviour and Culture of the Irish Retail Banks and considered the lessons to be drawn from it for all firms in the financial services sector.

It highlighted the contribution of recent scholarship to our understanding of the role of culture and diversity in firms. It also discussed possible tools that might be used by financial services firms in the future to improve organisational culture and diversity to the benefit of their customers, employees and shareholders.